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is my wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pol
of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over t
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
. >>guest: thank you. there is a science to them in the imitators i cannot speak for. but they are imitators so that says something. >>caller: yes it does your hangers are wonderful!! >>guest: happy holidays and i guess you are getting a gift bag for yourself as well. >>caller: [laughter] [laughter] >>host: the yugo mirijam thank you. --there you go. gorgeous! we know we love6 c13 hangers. the bag is a really special added bonus. >>guest: look how big it is. to fit 36 hangers. you put echo in here and give it as a gift.--a coat >>guest: i do not think i have ever seen this many people on the telephone number. call now do not miss out because i think it goes away when we do. >>host: it does. it goes away when we go away. [laughter] >>guest: i am not going there. if you are going to part with it as a gift do not forget about the guys.from their suits, shirts. you your husband colleen, if you are fighting over hangers, give him a gift.1-36 pack in the color he wants. >>host: purple sold out, go to your next favorite color. >>guest: we still have ruby red? >>host: we will track. t
'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions that we're given. that really is what needs to happen militarily. economically, we've got to stay informed in the -- invested in the region. you've got to have security forces. it's a sustainable force that works for afghans in the outyears. at the same time, diplomatically you've got to continue reconci
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
than myself and the big pocket it lined with drusy. >>host: there you had it. there the science behind that it is fascinating and it is interestingtalk about these rocks that literally date back 500 million years. that is the outside and inside you have little pockets little cavities with the herkimer form in order for us to create the today's special you go through and sort only the best rough. this is best of the best. it top grade quality is not get better for a hardcover. if you are looking an earring with sparkle and pizazz and personality -- it does not get better than the herkimer.getting these. these a so much fun. they are a starter they will say those earrings are beautiful what are you wearing? when you give these as a gift they will not it you can only find herkimer today's special boutique. in japan they love her car. -- herkimer, nobody sells it for less than $50.this is a special one day only offer. read the in pennsylvania who is shopping today. -- ritahere that you had ordered for pairs >>caller: one pair for me and three pairs as christmas gifts. it will be hard
quite a successful science company in our state for over 200 years. we have cars. we built a lot of cars over the years, g.m. and chrysler products. over half of the new york stock exchange, half the fortune 500, being credit card business in our state. the coast of our state is the site of the nation's summer capital, rehoboth beach and a bunch of other places. the letter "c" has been pretty big. people say why do they call you the first state? we're the first colony that threw off the yoke of the british tyranny and at the same time said pennsylvania take a hike, we want to be a state on our own. 225 years from tomorrow to be exact, the first state to ratify the constitution. but we have the best beaches in the country. last year i think there were four or five-star beaches in america, two in delaware. rehoboth and dewey. the best air force base in the world. we have, i think, the finest judiciary, finest judicial system in the state. we have the best financial controls and financial controls and cash management system. we have a triple-a credit rate system. we continue to have that ki
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11